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P.S. Augmentation
  1. Joshua A Hirsch1,
  2. Phillip M Meyers2,3,
  3. Mary E Jensen4
  1. 1Interventional Neuroradiology/Endovascular Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  2. 2Department of Neurosurgery, Interventional Neuroradiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA
  3. 3Department of Radiology, Interventional Neuroradiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA
  4. 4Department of Radiology, Interventional Neuroradiology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA
  1. Correspondence to Joshua A Hirsch, Director, Interventional Neuroradiology/Endovascular Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit St, Boston, MA 02114, USA; hirsch{at}snisonline.org

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In July 2009, Volume 1 of Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery (JNIS) was published. The Standards and Guidelines Committee of the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery (SNIS) were already working on the latest iteration of practice guidelines. The Executive Committee of the SNIS and the editorial leadership of the JNIS opted to publish these standards and guidelines in JNIS. The rationale for this approach was discussed in a JNIS editorial.1

When position statements represent the collaborative efforts of members of multiple medical societies in common interests, we would seek to publish the product in each society's journals. This approach was exemplified by publication of our multi-society stroke practice guidelines in the first volume of JNIS.2 This paper will be jointly published in the Journal of Neurosurgery.

In 2007, the American Society of Interventional and Therapeutic Neuroradiology (ASITN) in conjunction with multiple like-minded societies published a position statement on Percutaneous Vertebral Augmentation in the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (JVIR) and the American Journal of Neuroradiology (AJNR).3 4 This statement was recently republished in a special supplement to the JVIR. As part of the JNIS editorial decision described above, we planned to republish this position statement for our readership.

Since the publication of the original position statement, there has been extensive further reporting in the medical literature on vertebral augmentation. Most articles have advanced the thesis that vertebral augmentation …

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