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Original research
Balloon remodeling for aneurysm coil embolization with the coaxial lumen Scepter C balloon catheter: initial experience at a high volume center
  1. Alejandro M Spiotta1,2,
  2. Amrendra Miranpuri1,2,
  3. Harris Hawk2,
  4. M Imran Chaudry1,2,
  5. Aquilla S Turk1,2,
  6. Raymond D Turner1,2
  1. 1Division of Neurosciences, Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USA
  2. 2Department of Radiology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr R D Turner, Division of Neurosciences, Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas St, MSC 323, Charleston, SC 29425, USA; turnerrd{at}musc.edu

Abstract

Introduction The use of balloon remodeling allows for the treatment of aneurysms that were previously considered to be poor candidates for coil embolization. The Scepter C (Microvention, Tustin, California, USA) is a novel temporary occlusion balloon system with a dual coaxial lumen catheter. The design accommodates a more steerable 0.014 inch guidewire with improved control for delivery to the target lesion. We describe our initial experience with the use of this device for balloon remodeling to assist during aneurysm coil embolization.

Methods All aneurysms that were treated with balloon remodeling employing the Scepter C balloon at a single institution (Medical University of South Carolina) from the time it was available in October 2011 to July 2012 were evaluated. Patient demographics, aneurysm characteristics, procedural success, and adverse events were assessed.

Results 52 aneurysms were treated in 48 patients (45 women, three men) with a mean age of 59.3±11 years (mean±SD). Mean aneurysm height was 5.9±3 mm, width 4.4±2 mm with a 3.1±2 mm broad neck. A variety of aneurysms were treated. The most commonly utilized size was the 4 mm×10 mm (n=33) balloon. A Raymond 1 (complete occlusion) was achieved in the majority (n=44; 84.6%) of aneurysms, Raymond 2 (residual neck) in five, and Raymond 3 (residual aneurysm) in five. There was one complication (1.9%) attributed directly to balloon use.

Conclusions Our initial experience with the dual coaxial lumen Scepter C occlusion balloon catheter demonstrates its feasibility for use in balloon remodeling for aneurysm coil embolization. A variety of aneurysms at different locations were treated with satisfactory initial angiographic results and adverse event rates.

  • Aneurysm
  • Coil
  • Catheter
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