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Case series
Remission of neurovascular conflicts in the cerebellopontine angle in interventional neuroradiology
  1. Chuanhui Li,
  2. Youxiang Li,
  3. Chuhan Jiang,
  4. Zhongxue Wu,
  5. Yang Wang,
  6. Xinjian Yang
  1. Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Beijing Neurosurgical Institute and Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
  1. Correspondence to Dr Xinjian Yang, Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Beijing Neurosurgical Institute and Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, No. 6, Tiantan Xili, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100050, People's Republic of China; yang-xj{at}163.net

Abstract

Background and purpose To investigate the efficacy of endovascular treatment (EVT) for neurovascular conflicts (NVCs) in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) caused by intracranial aneurysms (IAs) and intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), including trigeminal neuralgia, hemifacial spasm, and glossopharyngeal neuralgia.

Materials and methods From January 2010 to January 2014, 14 consecutive patients presenting with three NVCs caused by IAs or intracranial AVMs were admitted to our department. The clinical outcomes of these NVCs after EVT were retrospectively analyzed.

Results For four patients with IAs, angiographic follow-up confirmed total occlusion of the lesion in all, and the clinical outcomes of NVC were as follows: gradual relief in two (50%), transient partial relief but recurrence in one (25%), and no palliative effect in one (25%). For the 10 patients with intracranial AVMs, one (10%) experienced transient relief of NVC after angiogram examination (no EVT was performed). Of the other nine patients who received EVT, angiographic follow-up was obtained in seven (70%), demonstrating total obliteration of the lesion in three (30%), subtotal obliteration in two (20%), and partial obliteration in two (20%). Clinical outcomes included immediate relief of NVCs after single EVT in two cases (20%), gradual relief after single EVT in five (50%, one of them experienced transient aggravation), and complete relief after two sessions of EVT in two (20%). Complications of transient cranial nerve paresis related to EVT occurred in two cases (20%) with intracranial AVMs. In all, complete lasting relief of the NVCs was obtained finally in 11 cases (78.6%).

Conclusions EVT is a feasible and less invasive approach for relief of NVCs in the CPA caused by IA or intracranial AVM and could be considered as a therapeutic option in these situations.

  • Aneurysm
  • Arteriovenous Malformation
  • Cranial nerve
  • Posterior fossa
  • Fistula

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