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Case report
Basilar artery occlusion in a child treated successfully with mechanical thrombectomy using ADAPT
  1. Jonathan Lena1,
  2. Ramin Eskandari1,
  3. Libby Infinger1,
  4. Kyle M Fargen2,
  5. Alejandro Spiotta1,
  6. Aquilla Turk1,
  7. Raymond D Turner3,
  8. Imran Chaudry4
  1. 1Department of Neurosciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USA
  2. 2Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USA
  3. 3Department of Neurosciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, USA
  4. 4Department of Radiology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr J Lena, Department of Neurosciences, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street, Suite 301 CSB, Charleston, SC 29455, USA; lena{at}musc.edu

Abstract

Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) in the pediatric population is rare. Furthermore, it is common for physicians to take significantly longer diagnosing a posterior circulation stroke in a child than in an adult. There are increasing case reports in the literature of treating AIS in children with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, intra-arterial thrombolysis, and/or mechanical thrombectomy. We present the first case of pediatric AIS treated using a direct aspiration first pass technique (ADAPT) as a means of mechanical thrombectomy.

  • Brain
  • Device
  • Pediatrics
  • Thrombectomy

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Footnotes

  • Republished with permission from BMJ Case Reports Published 11 April 2016; doi:10.1136/bcr-2015-012195

  • Contributors Each author listed should receive authorship credit based on material contribution to this article, their revision of this article, and their final approval of this article for submission to this journal.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Not obtained.

  • Ethics approval The study was approved by the institutional review board of the Medical University of South Carolina.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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