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Cerebellar hemangioblastoma supplied by persistent hypoglossal artery
  1. Mandy J Binning1,4,
  2. Adnan H Siddiqui1,2,3,4
  1. 1Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, USA
  2. 2Department of Radiology, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, USA
  3. 3Toshiba Stroke Research Center, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, USA
  4. 4Department of Neurosurgery, Millard Fillmore Gates Hospital, Kaleida Health, Buffalo, New York, USA
  1. Correspondence to Adnan H Siddiqui, University at Buffalo Neurosurgery, Millard Fillmore Gates Hospital, Kaleida Health, 3 Gates Circle, Buffalo, NY 14209, USA; asiddiqui{at}ubns.com

Abstract

The authors report a unique case of an intramedullary cerebellar hemangioblastoma that was supplied by a persistent hypoglossal artery. In this case, recognition of the persistent hypoglossal artery through angiographic imaging was crucial in identifying tumor blood supply and in guiding the decision to perform a craniotomy without tumor embolization.

  • Cerebellar hemangioblastoma
  • endovascular embolization
  • persistent hypoglossal artery
  • posterior fossa craniectomy
  • artery
  • brain
  • congenital
  • angiography
  • technique

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Footnotes

  • Competing interests Dr. Siddiqui has received research grants from the National Institutes of Health (co-investigator: NINDS 1R01NS064592-01A1, Hemodynamic induction of pathologic remodeling leading to intracranial aneurysms) and the University at Buffalo (Research Development Award); holds financial interests in Hotspur, Intratech Medical, StimSox, and Valor Medical; serves as a consultant to Codman & Shurtleff, Inc., Concentric Medical, ev3/Covidien Vascular Therapies, GuidePoint Global Consulting, and Penumbra; belongs to the speakers' bureaus of Codman & Shurtleff, Inc. and Genentech; serves on an advisory board for Codman & Shurtleff; and has received honoraria from American Association of Neurological Surgeons' courses, an Emergency Medicine Conference, Genentech, Neocure Group LLC, and from Abbott Vascular and Codman & Shurtleff, Inc. for training other neurointerventionists in carotid stenting and for training physicians in endovascular stenting for aneurysms. Dr. Siddiqui receives no consulting salary arrangements. All consulting is per project and/or per hour.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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