Article Text

other Versions

PDF
Original research
Association between hemodynamic conditions and occlusion times after flow diversion in cerebral aneurysms
  1. Fernando Mut1,2,
  2. Marcelo Raschi1,
  3. Esteban Scrivano3,
  4. Carlos Bleise3,
  5. Jorge Chudyk3,
  6. Rosana Ceratto3,
  7. Pedro Lylyk3,
  8. Juan R Cebral1
  1. 1Center for Computational Fluid Dynamics, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia, USA
  2. 2Instituto de Ciências Matemáticas e de Computação, Universidade de São Paulo, São Carlos, Brazil
  3. 3Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Instituto Clinico ENERI, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  1. Correspondence to Dr Fernando Mut, Center for Computational Fluid Dynamics, George Mason University, 4400 University Dr, MSN 6A2, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA; fermut{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Background Evaluation of flow diversion treatment of intracranial aneurysms is difficult owing to lack of knowledge of the target hemodynamic environment.

Objective To identify hemodynamic conditions created after flow diversion that induce fast aneurysm occlusion.

Methods Two groups of aneurysms treated with flow diverters alone were selected: (a) aneurysms completely occluded at 3 months (fast occlusion), and (b) aneurysms patent or incompletely occluded at 6 months (slow occlusion). A total of 23 aneurysms were included in the study. Patient-specific computational fluid dynamics models were constructed and used to characterize the hemodynamic environment immediately before and after treatment. Average post-treatment hemodynamic conditions between the fast and slow occlusion groups were statistically compared.

Results Aneurysms in the fast occlusion group had significantly lower post-treatment mean velocity (fast=1.13cm/s, slow=3.11cm/s, p=0.02), inflow rate (fast=0.47mL/s, slow=1.89mL/s, p=0.004) and shear rate (fast=20.52 1/s, slow=32.37 1/s, p=0.02) than aneurysms in the slow occlusion group. Receiver operating characteristics analysis showed that mean post-treatment velocity, inflow rate, and shear rate below a certain threshold could discriminate between aneurysms of the fast and slow occlusion groups with good accuracy (84%, 77%, and 76%, respectively).

Conclusions The occlusion time of cerebral aneurysms treated with flow diverters can be predicted by the hemodynamic conditions created immediately after device implantation. Specifically, low post-implantation flow velocity, inflow rate, and shear rate are associated with fast occlusion times.

  • Aneurysm
  • Flow Diverter
  • Stent

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.