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CASE REPORT
Endovascular recanalisation with drug coated balloon for chronic symptomatic middle cerebral artery total occlusion
  1. Jun Zhang,
  2. Xiao Zhang,
  3. Jin-Ping Zhang,
  4. Ju Han
  1. Department of Neurology, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, China
  1. Correspondence to Professor Ju Han, Department of Neurology, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Medical School of Shandong University, Jinan 250100, China; hanjujack{at}163.com

Abstract

The optimal treatment for patients with chronic symptomatic middle cerebral artery (MCA) total occlusion is not well established. In addition to medical therapy, vessel recanalisation with stenting has shown much promise, especially for patients with recurrent ischemic symptoms. Nevertheless, the incidence of symptomatic in-stent restenosis (ISR) is high, and is associated with an unfavorable prognosis. Drug coated balloons (DCBs) have been proven to be effective in treating and preventing ISR. However, the feasibility of DCBs for de novo intracranial atherothrombotic stenosis has not been previously described, especially for total occlusion lesions. Here we reported a patient with chronic left MCA total occlusion successfully treated with DCBs, with a good outcome at the 1 year follow-up. More studies are warranted to further compare the efficacy of DCBs and stentings for intracranial revascularisation.

  • angioplasty
  • balloon
  • stenosis

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Footnotes

  • Republished with permission from BMJ Case Reports Published March 15, 2018; doi: 10.1136/bcr-2017-013548.rep

  • Contributors Study concept and design: JH. Cases data collection: JZ, XZ, and J-PZ. Analysis and interpretation of the data: JH and JZ. Drafting of the manuscript: JH and JZ. Study supervision: JH. All authors were involved in critically analyzing the paper and approve the contents of the paper. All authors also agree to be accountable for all aspects of the work submitted for publication.

  • Funding This research received no specific grant from any funding agency in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Obtained.

  • Ethics approval The study was approved by Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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