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Mechanical thrombectomy in patients with acute cancer-related stroke: is the stent retriever alone effective?
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  • Published on:
    Technical feasibility and clinical impact.
    • Julián A Beltrán S, Radiologist/Neuroradiologist/Interventional Neuroradiologist and Oncology interventional radiologist Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, Bogotá, Colombia

    After reading the interesting article by Jeon et al, indeed, the first series of cases of revascularization in cerebral infarction, it is important to point out several aspects related to the cancer patient. Cancer is a heterogeneous group of diseases with some points in common related to cellular behavior in the face of cell division controls and their local and systemic effects. Its incidence and prevalence are increasing, and the borders of treatment are changing, as is the disease itself. Patients with active cancer, therefore, should be approached in a multidisciplinary strategy, for the management of their oncological pathology or associated patient comorbidities. Stroke does not escape this strategy, because it does not have the same clinical impact to treat a patient with an oncological disease in early staging compared to one in advanced staging or in disease progression in palliative care and short calculated survival. It is not possible to establish a general rule of treatment in stroke with active cancer for these reasons, and a careful analysis of which primary tumors, their staging or clinical evolution of response to treatment, are necessary to clarify the clinical picture of stroke treatment in the oncological disease context.

    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.