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Distribution of symptomatic cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage assessed using cone beam CT angiography
  1. Francesco Diana1,
  2. Daniele Giuseppe Romano1,
  3. Simone Peschillo2,3
  1. 1Department of Neuroradiology, University Hospital 'San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi d’Aragona', Salerno, Campania, Italy
  2. 2Department of Surgical Medical Sciences and Advanced Technologies "G.F. Ingrassia" - Endovascular Neurosurgery, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
  3. 3Endovascular Neurosurgery, Pia Fondazione Cardinale Giovanni Panico Hospital, Tricase, LE, Italy
  1. Correspondence to Dr Francesco Diana, Department of Neuroradiology, University Hospital 'San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi d’Aragona', via San Leonardo, Salerno (SA), 84125, Campania, Italy; francesco.diana.md{at}gmail.com

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We read with interest the article by Simonato et al on the distribution of symptomatic cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage assessed using cone beam CT angiography.1 The authors assessed cerebral arterial diameters with cone beam CT angiography in a cohort of 30 patients who underwent percutaneous balloon angioplasty for cerebral vasospasm and concluded that symptomatic cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage does not involve arteries smaller than 900 µm and frequently predominate in middle or distal segments.

The authors hypothesized that small arteries have a reduced vasoconstriction ability due to their thinner muscular wall. However, this speculation is not in line with several studies assessing the myogenic response of cerebral vessels.2–6 All of these studies defined the myogenic vasoconstriction or vasodilatation of brain …

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Footnotes

  • Twitter @fdianamd

  • Contributors FD conceived and wrote the letter. DGR and SP helped with the final editing and approval.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.

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