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Original research
Clinical outcomes of rescue stenting for failed endovascular thrombectomy: a multicenter prospective registry
  1. Jang-Hyun Baek1,2,
  2. Byung Moon Kim3,
  3. Eun Hyun Ihm4,
  4. Chang-Hyun Kim5,
  5. Dong Joon Kim3,
  6. Ji Hoe Heo2,
  7. Hyo Suk Nam2,
  8. Young Dae Kim2,
  9. Sangil Suh6,
  10. Byungjun Kim7,
  11. Yoodong Won8,
  12. Byung Hyun Baek9,
  13. Woong Yoon9,
  14. Hyon-Jo Kwon10,
  15. Yoonkyung Chang11,
  16. Cheolkyu Jung12,
  17. Hae Woong Jeong13
  1. 1Department of Neurology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  2. 2Department of Neurology, Severance Stroke Center, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  3. 3Interventional Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Severance Stroke Center, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  4. 4Department of Neurosurgery, Andong Hospital, Andong, Korea (the Republic of)
  5. 5Department of Neurosurgery, Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  6. 6Department of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  7. 7Department of Radiology, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  8. 8Department of Radiology, Uijeongbu St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Uijeongbu, Korea (the Republic of)
  9. 9Department of Radiology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea (the Republic of)
  10. 10Department of Neurosurgery, Regional Cerebrovascular Center, Chungnam National University Hospital, Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon, Korea (the Republic of)
  11. 11Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Mokdong Hospital, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  12. 12Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea (the Republic of)
  13. 13Diagnostic Radiology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea (the Republic of)
  1. Correspondence to Dr Byung Moon Kim, Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of); bmoon21{at}hanmail.net

Abstract

Background Mechanical thrombectomy (MT) is a primary endovascular modality for acute intracranial large vessel occlusion. However, further treatment, such as rescue stenting, is occasionally necessary for refractory cases. We aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of rescue stenting in first-line MT failure and to identify the clinical factors affecting its clinical outcome.

Methods A multicenter prospective registry was designed for this study. We enrolled consecutive patients who underwent rescue stenting for first-line MT failure. Endovascular details and outcomes, follow-up patency of the stented artery, and clinical outcomes were summarized and compared between the favorable and unfavorable outcome groups.

Results A total of 78 patients were included. Intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis was the most common etiology for rescue stenting (97.4%). Seventy-seven patients (98.7%) were successfully recanalized by rescue stenting. A favorable outcome was observed in 66.7% of patients. Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage and mortality were observed in 5.1% and 4.0% of patients, respectively. The stented artery was patent in 82.1% of patients on follow-up angiography. In a multivariable analysis, a patent stent on follow-up angiography was an independent factor for a favorable outcome (OR 87.6; 95% CI 4.77 to 1608.9; p=0.003). Postprocedural intravenous maintenance of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor was significantly associated with the follow-up patency of the stented artery (OR 5.72; 95% CI 1.45 to 22.6; p=0.013).

Conclusions In this multicenter prospective registry, rescue stenting for first-line MT failure was effective and safe. For a favorable outcome, follow-up patency of the stented artery was important, which was significantly associated with postprocedural maintenance of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors.

  • stent
  • stroke
  • thrombectomy
  • atherosclerosis

Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request. The relevant anonymized data are available on reasonable request.

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Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request. The relevant anonymized data are available on reasonable request.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors BMK is responsible for the overall content as the guarantor. BMK had full access to all of the data in the study and takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis. Study concept and design: BMK. Acquisition of clinical data: BMK, EHI, C-HK, DJK, JHH, HSN, YDK, SS, BK, YW, BHB, WY, H-JK, YC, CJ, and HWJ. Analysis and interpretation of data: J-HB and BMK. Drafting of the manuscript: J-HB. Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: J-HB and BMK. Statistical analysis: J-HB and BMK. Final approval of the version to be published: J-HB, BMK, EHI, C-HK, DJK, JHH, HSN, YDK, SS, BK, YW, BHB, WY, H-JK, YC, CJ, and HWJ.

  • Funding This study was investigator-initiated and supported/funded by a grant from Medtronic Korea.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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