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Original research
Early neurological improvement as a predictor of outcomes after endovascular thrombectomy for stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis
  1. Hassan Kobeissi1,
  2. Sherief Ghozy2,
  3. Cem Bilgin2,
  4. Ramanathan Kadirvel2,
  5. David F Kallmes2
  1. 1College of Medicine, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, Michigan, USA
  2. 2Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA
  1. Correspondence to Hassan Kobeissi, Central Michigan University College of Medicine, Mount Pleasant, USA; kobei1h{at}cmich.edu

Abstract

Background Early neurological improvement (ENI) is a potential predictor for 90-day outcomes following mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke (AIS). We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to better understand whether ENI can be used as a surrogate for long-term outcomes following mechanical thrombectomy for AIS.

Methods Following the PRISMA guidelines, a systematic literature review of the English language literature was conducted using PubMed, MEDLINE, and Embase. ENI definition, including timing and degree of improvement on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), was catalogued for each included study. Outcomes of interest included 90-day modified Rankin Scale (mRS) 0–2, symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH), and mortality. We calculated pooled ORs and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) for all definitions of ENI.

Results We included nine studies with 2355 patients in our analysis. ENI definitions included improvement in NIHSS of 8 points, 4 points, 12%, and 30% or greater. There was a significant association between ENI and mRS 0–2 rates (OR 8.62, 95% CI 4.86 to 15.29; p<0.001). Significance of the association was maintained across all definitions (p<0.001). Moreover, achieving ENI was a significant predictor of reduced odds for reported sICH rates (OR 0.11, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.21; p<0.001). There was a significant association between ENI and reduction in mortality rates (OR 0.09, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.15; p<0.001).

Conclusions Broadly defined, ENI is a promising predictor of good functional outcome at 90 days and is associated with lower rates of mortality and sICH.

  • Stroke
  • Thrombectomy

Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request. The data that support the findings of this study are available from the corresponding author upon reasonable request.

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Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request. The data that support the findings of this study are available from the corresponding author upon reasonable request.

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Footnotes

  • HK and SG contributed equally.

  • Contributors All authors contributed to the manuscript. HK, SG, RK, and DFK were responsible for the conception and design of the work. HK, SG, and CB were responsible for collection of the data. All authors were involved in the drafting of the article, critical revision of the article, and final approval of the version to be published. HK is responsible for the overall content as guarantor.

  • Funding Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01NS076491.

  • Disclaimer The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

  • Competing interests DFK holds equity in Nested Knowledge, Superior Medical Editors, and Conway Medical, Marblehead Medical; is a consultant for MicroVention, Medtronic, Balt, and Insera Therapeutics; Data Safety Monitoring Board for Vesalio; and receives royalties from Medtronic.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.

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